Have you Prepared for the Inevitable?

Updated: Jun 14

September is Emergency Preparedness Month. Part of being prepared is taking care of your family in the event something unexpected happens to you. This includes having an estate plan in place to handle your financial, healthcare, and even your social media-related wishes. These topics as well as an overview of what to do when a spouse or partner passes away will be covered throughout September.


Only 45 percent of adults have a will or other estate documents in place, which may not be entirely surprising. No one wants to be reminded of their mortality or spend too much time thinking about what might happen once they’re gone.


Only 45% of adults have their estate plans in order. Are you in the majority?
You have worked hard to create a legacy for your loved ones. You deserve to decide what becomes of it.

This article will discuss the 4 key components of a will. Next week we will provide an introduction to other essential estate planning documents related to your financial matters and healthcare. So if you haven't yet, subscribe. You'll become a Peak Wealth Insider and gain valuable financial educational tools.


What is a Will?

A will is an instrument of power. Creating one gives you control over the distribution of your assets. If you die without one, the state decides what becomes of your property, without regard to your priorities.


A will is a legal document by which an individual or a couple (known as “testator”) identifies their wishes regarding the distribution of their assets after death. A will can typically be broken down into four main parts.


1. Executors

Most wills begin by naming an executor. Executors are responsible for carrying out the wishes outlined in a will. This involves assessing the value of the estate, gathering the assets, paying inheritance tax and other debts (if necessary), and distributing assets among beneficiaries. It’s recommended that you name at least two executors, in case your first choice is unable to fulfill the obligation.


2. Guardians

A will allows you to designate a guardian for your minor children. Whomever you appoint, you will want to make sure beforehand that the individual is able and willing to assume the responsibility. For many people, this is the most important part of a will since, if you die without naming a guardian, the court will decide who takes care of your children.


3. Gifts

This section enables you to identify people or organizations to whom you wish to give gifts of money or specific possessions, such as jewelry or a car. You can also specify conditional gifts, such as a sum of money to a young daughter, but only when she reaches a certain age.


4. Estate

Your estate encompasses everything you own, including real property, financial investments, cash, and personal possessions. Once you have identified specific gifts you would like to distribute, you can apportion the rest of your estate in equal shares among your heirs, or you can split it into percentages. For example, you may decide to give 45 percent each to two children and the remaining 10 percent to a sibling.


The law does not require that a will be drawn up by a professional, and some people choose to create their own wills at home. But where wills are concerned, there is little room for error. You will not be around when the will is read to correct technical errors or clear up confusion. When you draft a will, consider enlisting the help of a legal or financial professional, especially if you have a large estate or complex family situation.

 

Depending on your circumstances, an attorney or financial advisor may also suggest that you have a power of attorney for financial or healthcare matters, a living trust, and a living will. These items will be covered in our next post.


Preparing for the eventual distribution of your assets may not sound enticing. But remember, a will puts the power in your hands. You have worked hard to create a legacy for your loved ones. You deserve to decide what becomes of it.


Final thought.

Are you comfortable with your progress towards retirement? How about helping future generations meet their financial goals? If you have a net worth over $2 million and need help from a wealth manager, the Peak Wealth Planning team can assist you.



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About the Author

Peter Newman is a Chartered Financial Advisor (CFA) and president of Peak Wealth Planning. He works with individuals nationwide that have accumulated wealth through company stock, ESOP shares, real estate, or running a business. Peter applies his unique background to help clients achieve their specific goals and enjoy peace of mind.


Peak Wealth Planning provides concierge services to meet your wealth management needs. Services include: financial planning, investment management, esop diversification, retirement income, insurance, and estate planning advice. Peak Wealth Planning is a fee-based financial advisor based in Champaign, Illinois, and Fraser, Colorado.