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Find Forgotten Retirement Accounts

Do you have a long-lost retirement account left with a former employer? Maybe it’s been so long that you can’t even remember. With over 24 million “forgotten” 401(k) accounts holding roughly $1.35 trillion in assets, even the most organized professional may be surprised to learn that they have unclaimed “found” money.


This article will help you discover whether you have money left at a former employer’s retirement plan. The time spent could be well worth the effort. A couple years ago, one Peak Wealth Planning client discovered a forgotten account with $100,000. Of course you may find a lower amount, but found money is better than none at all.


Discover funds you didn’t know you still had. Magnifying glass finds cash in tall grass
Have you lost track of assets from forgotten 401(k) accounts? Begin the search to the fund.

What Are “Forgotten” Retirement Accounts?

Considering that baby boomers alone have worked an average of 12 jobs in their lifetimes, it can be all too easy for retirement accounts to get lost in the shuffle. Think back to your first job. Can you remember what happened to your work-sponsored retirement plan? If you’re even slightly unsure, then it’s time to go looking for your potentially forgotten funds.


Starting Your Search

One of the best ways to find lost retirement accounts is to contact your former employers. If you’re unsure where to direct your call, try the human resources or accounting department. They should be able to check their plan records to see if you’ve ever participated. However, you will most likely be asked to provide your full name, Social Security number, and the dates you worked, so be sure to come prepared.


If your former employer is no longer around, look for an old account statement. Often, these will have the contact information for the plan administrator. If you don’t have an old statement, consider reaching out to former coworkers who may have the information you need.

Even if these first steps don’t turn up much info, they can help you gather important information.


Websites to Check

Next, it’s time to take your search online. Make sure you have as much information as possible at hand and give the following resources a try.


This database uses employer and Department of Labor data to determine if you have any unpaid or lost retirement account money. Like most of these online tools, you’ll need to provide your Social Security number, but no additional information is required.


If your forgotten account was worth more than $1,000 but less than $5,000, it might have been rolled into a default traditional Individual Retirement Account (IRA). Employers create default IRAs when a former employee can’t be located or fails to respond when contacted. You can search for retirement and IRA accounts for free using this database, but registration is required.


Finally, the Department of Labor tracks plans that have been abandoned or are in the process of being terminated. Try searching its database to find the qualified termination administrator (QTA) responsible for directing the shutdown of the plan.


What’s Next?

Once you’ve found your retirement account, what you do with it depends on the type of plan and where it’s held. It also depends on how close you are to retirement and how the account fits into your overall retirement strategy.


No matter what you decide to do, be sure to involve your tax preparer and financial advisor since they’ll be informed on up to date regulations that may affect you. They can also help you identify a strategy for your newfound money: travel, investment, or maybe that vacation home you’ve always wanted. You worked hard for that money, after all, so you should get to enjoy it!


Final thought.

Do you need help getting organized for retirement? Want to learn when you can actually retire, or forecast how much money you need to retire?


If you have more than $2 million saved and need help from a wealth manager, the Peak Wealth Planning team can assist.

Peak Wealth Planning specializes in helping high-net worth individuals and families plan for the future.

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About the Author

Peter Newman is a Chartered Financial Advisor (CFA) and president of Peak Wealth Planning. He works with individuals nationwide that have accumulated wealth through company stock, ESOP shares, real estate, or running a business. Peter applies his unique background to help clients achieve their specific goals and enjoy peace of mind.


Peak Wealth Planning provides concierge services to meet your wealth management needs. Services include: financial planning, investment management, esop diversification, retirement income, insurance, and estate planning advice. Peak Wealth Planning is a fee-based financial advisor based in Champaign, Illinois, and Fraser, Colorado.




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